Armistice Day Centenary

Detail of the World War I memorial plaque below the “Easter Morn” art glass window panels in the north transept of the Sanctuary of Shadyside Presbyterian Church. Presented in 1920 by Mr. and Mrs. James H. Hammond to the glory of God with thanksgiving for peace and victory, the bronze tablet was created by Signor Giuseppi Moretti.Remembering Those Who Have Passed; Praying for Peace

November 11, 2018, will mark 100 years since Germany and the Allies signed an agreement to end hostilities during World War I. The years that this war raged have left their mark around the world, including in our own congregation. Take a moment to read the names of those in our congregation who served in WWI written on the plaque on the pulpit side transept in our Sanctuary. The placement of this plaque could not be more appropriate, for when you take a step back from reading the names and look up, you see, portrayed in the beauty of stained glass, both Mary grieving by the empty tomb and the resurrected Christ hovering above you. As wars continue around the world, the juxtaposition of this plaque and the stained glass remind us that, even as we grieve like Mary for the loss of loved ones, when confronted with death, our hope is in the resurrected Christ — for we are promised, “that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor rulers, nor things present, nor things to come, nor powers, nor height, nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord.” (Romans 8:38-39).

On November 4, when we celebrate All Saints’ Day as a congregation both in our morning and afternoon services, we remember all who passed before us and entered the Church Triumphant. And on November?11, as a nation, we remember all who served and work for peace, including those who are forever etched on the plaque in our Sanctuary. Please take time this November to remember and honor those who have passed; to give thanks for those who promote peace; and to pray for Christ’s reign of peace, in which we place our hope, to come.

Contributed by the Reverend John F. Magnuson, Associate Pastor for Discipleship

Architectural Photograph: Detail of the World War I memorial plaque below the “Easter Morn” art glass window panels in the north transept of the Sanctuary of Shadyside Presbyterian Church. Presented in 1920 by Mr. and Mrs. James H. Hammond to the glory of God with thanksgiving for peace and victory, the bronze tablet was created by Signor Giuseppi Moretti.

Perspective on Stewardship

Abounding in Hope

“May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, so that you may abound in hope by the power of the Holy Spirit.” (Romans 15:13)

In today’s digital age, it is increasingly difficult to manage the information and opinions our children see and hear. Much of the content we consume is filled with despair, and how this information manifests in our youth is of great concern to caregivers everywhere. As our ability to filter this noise diminishes, it is exceedingly important for our children to build a true understanding of the world around them – to see, hear, speak, and demonstrate hope and joy in daily life.

We strive to expose our girls to the teachings of Christ in both active and passive ways. Whether it is through a lesson at children’s chapel on Sunday or an act of kindness by one of us, we seek to provide and demonstrate examples of God’s steadfast and abounding love at every opportunity. Some time ago, we heard a pastor compare Sunday worship to a symphony warming up before a performance. This metaphor rings true for us today, especially as we work to instill values in our children. Sundays at Shadyside help us to stay “in-tune” with our beliefs and renew our efforts to rejoice as a family in all that is good and hopeful in the world around us.

Contributed by Trustee Alexander G. Dick and Rebecca H. Dick

Perspective on Stewardship

Abounding in Hope

“May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, so that you may abound in hope by the power of the Holy Spirit.” (Romans 15:13)

Hope, joy, peace, power — all very emotionally strong words. I have found all of these from within the people of Shadyside Presbyterian Church.

I joined the church back in 2008, coming off a time in my life when I felt hopeless and as far from joy, peace, and power as I could be. The church and its ministry, particularly missions, carried me to a place where I could see joy and understand the power in giving and the peace that it brings.

Today, I am blessed to be a part of our community outreach and am honored to work with such faithful and caring people. So, to the incredible pastors and parishioners who have had me in their prayers over the years, sharing laughter and tears, I thank you!

I look forward to what the next ten years bring with my family here at Shadyside Presbyterian Church!

Contributed by Deacon Lisa Iadicicco

Perspective on Stewardship

Abounding in Hope

“May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, so that you may abound in hope by the power of the Holy Spirit.” (Romans 15:13)

For all of us, hope, trust, and discipline complement one another. These were instilled into me by my parents and my father’s mother. These attributes were further reinforced by my wife after we got married.

I was brought up as a Lutheran, and I came to Shadyside Presbyterian Church (SPC) three weeks after my arrival in the United States, and then Pittsburgh, in August of 1963. The SPC ministers, staff, and congregation made me feel immediately at home. A similar welcome was extended to my wife. Both of our children were baptized at SPC, both of them were married here, and our granddaughter was also baptized at SPC.

Helga and I, as grandparents, continue our membership here, as the “younger” generations live much farther away, but their spirits are always at home. We are very thankful for the continuing expressions of love. In the last two years, we also received lots of support from the SPC staff and congregation, providing for our lasting hope, another beacon in our lives.

Contributed by Peter J. Freymark, with Helga G. Freymark

Perspective on Stewardship

Abounding in Hope

“May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, so that you may abound in hope by the power of the Holy Spirit.” (Romans 15:13)

Hope. What is our reason for hope? Is it not Christ alone? Dear ones, we have been given so much hope – we have been given the very gift of Christ Himself, the hope of glory who dwells within us (Colossians 1:27). Where, O death, is thy victory? Where, O death, is thy sting? (1 Corinthians 15:55). The grave cannot keep us. And if the grave cannot keep us, then what a life we have to live! Are we living, friends? Are we living to please God? Are we available to be used by Him – not in a striving manner, where we seek to check off a box, but rather in a manner that seeks to lay down our lives in humble obedience in order to take up His call? What adventure is calling! In whatever circumstance or life situation you find yourself, you have the opportunity to respond to His call this day. Smith Wigglesworth said it best when he noted, “God does not call those who are equipped, He equips those whom He has called.” What is He calling you to do this day? Answer His call, dear friends.

Contributed by Elder Krissy K. Moehling

Advent Reflection: Dec. 25, 2017

Seasonal Devotions

Scripture: John 1:1–5  (Today’s Readings)

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was with God in the beginning. Through him all things were made; without him nothing was made that has been made. In him was life, and that life was the light of men. The light shines in the darkness, but the darkness has not understood it.  (John 1:1-5)

In the dramatic opening of his gospel, John the apostle boldly declares the identity of Jesus. Jesus is the incarnation of Almighty God. He is both fully human and fully divine. He is God. In Him exists creation, redemption, and salvation.

Jesus Christ is the light of life and salvation, yet He came to us as a humble Child, born in a stable. Despite the truth He shared and the healing He brought, we often deny Him, His Word, and our desperate need of salvation which only He can provide.

Yet, He loves us still.

The darkness of the world and the darkness of our own sin have not diminished the radiance of our Lord. His light shines in our darkest hours, illuminating His love, His mercy, and His invitation to us to come and live in His light.

What do you face this glorious Christmas Day? Amidst the celebrations of this day, are you facing illness or the loss of a loved one? Do you face joblessness or financial stress or severe marital discord? Whatever you face today, celebrate the brilliant light shining in our darkness: the light of our Lord, Jesus Christ, born in Bethlehem!

Merry Christmas!

The Reverend Dr. Conrad C. Sharps and Mrs. Lauren Ford Sharps

Read more Advent Reflections on the blog of the Shadyside Presbyterian Church website.

Download the full booklet of Advent Reflections.

Artwork: Detail of No Between © Jan L. Richardson. janrichardson.com. Inspired by Isaiah 64:1: “O that You would tear open the heavens and come down … .”

Advent Reflection: Dec. 24, 2017

Seasonal Devotions

Scripture: Isaiah 60:1–6  (Today’s Readings)

Arise, shine; for thy light is come, and the glory of the Lord is risen upon thee. For, behold, the darkness shall cover the earth, and gross darkness the people: but the Lord shall arise upon thee, and His glory shall be seen upon thee. And the Gentiles shall come to thy light, and kings to the brightness of thy rising.  (Isaiah 60:1-3)

Light is essential to biological life; light in life indicates vitality and prosperity. Light is essential to vision. In Genesis, God summons light — its creation is a direct result of God’s command. It is with light that the first day of creation is born. This occurs in the second sentence of the Bible.

One of the most dramatic passages in choral music occurs about eight minutes into the beginning of Franz Joseph Haydn’s oratorio, The Creation. The orchestra begins with an extended, wandering prelude depicting the earth without form and void. The narrator enters, still very quietly, with the opening words of Genesis. On the word “light,” the full orchestra and choir burst forth with a subito fortissimo. The oratorio moves swiftly from this defining moment.

What a marvelous image we have to usher in our journey through the Bible and our ongoing image of the Divine: Jesus, the Light of the World. “Thy Word is a lamp to my feet and a light for my path.” Echoing Isaiah, Matthew says of the arrival of Jesus, “the people living in darkness have seen a great light; on those living in the land of the shadow of death a light has dawned.” The Psalmist speaks of the Lord being the “Light of My Salvation” T. S. Elliot has a stunning poem in his pageant play, The Rock: “O Light Invisible, We Praise Thee.” The poem/prayer is a meditation in and of itself.

In these days of winter, when darkness increasingly covers the earth, we all crave the coveted hours of daylight. We light lanterns and tapers; we cover our Christmas trees and cottages with colorful coruscations; we escape to places where we can soak in sunshine. We yearn for spring, when each day unfolds with more brilliance than the one before. With this escalation of effulgence we associate budding flowers and trees — the reassurance of renewed life.

Not only do we long for more light, we long for the warmth associated with its luminosity. And so it is with God’s presence in our lives. We have an inborn need for the radiance and warmth emanating from the Light of the World. What are the sources of light in your own world which illuminate the love and grace of the Divine?

Prayer: Dear God, we want to see your brightness. Clear sun of righteousness, shine on our path and show us the way to the Father. In you, O God, there is no darkness at all; the night and the day are both alike. The Lamb is the light of the city of God. Shine in our hearts, Lord Jesus.  Amen.

Contributed by Mark A. Anderson

Read more Advent Reflections on the blog of the Shadyside Presbyterian Church website.

Download the full booklet of Advent Reflections.

Artwork: Detail of No Between © Jan L. Richardson. janrichardson.com. Inspired by Isaiah 64:1: “O that You would tear open the heavens and come down … .”

Advent Reflection: Dec. 23, 2017

Seasonal Devotions

Scripture: Luke 1:67–80  (Today’s Readings)

The journey leading to Christmas is filled with periods of waiting, and, in this passage, we find ourselves at the end of one such period and in the middle of another.

After not believing God’s promise, Zechariah waits mutely for months until the promise is fulfilled in the form of a son. Zechariah breaks his silence, praising God for His mercy and promises of the past, and prophesying about God’s future gift of Jesus, for whom his son John will prepare the way. This marks the beginning of the end of a wait that began ages ago.

God shows us mercy and keeps His promises even when we don’t believe that He will. As we await the coming of Christ, may we look both to the past and to the future, rejoicing in the blessings we have received and trusting that God will be with us.

Prayer: Loving God, thank You for showing us Your mercy and shining Your light upon us, even when we fail to believe in Your promises. Guide us as we walk through this Advent season so that we may grow to be strong in spirit.  Amen.

Contributed by Emma R. Balaan, Deacon

Read more Advent Reflections on the blog of the Shadyside Presbyterian Church website.

Download the full booklet of Advent Reflections.

Artwork: Detail of No Between © Jan L. Richardson. janrichardson.com. Inspired by Isaiah 64:1: “O that You would tear open the heavens and come down … .”

Advent Reflection: Dec. 22, 2017

Seasonal Devotions

Scripture: Luke 1:57–66  (Today’s Readings)

This Advent season looks a bit different in our family as we eagerly anticipate the birth of our third child, a son, this coming February. There is a lot to consider with the decision of what to name a child. In our case, our daughters both have rather traditional names that came from within our extended family. When choosing our son’s name, we have kept that in mind and are looking over our male relative’s names and deciding what will be the best fit. It is not an easy decision, and it is one the child will live with for the rest of his life!

In our Scripture passage, Zechariah and Elizabeth were in a similar scenario with their firstborn son. In Jewish tradition for that time, the baby would not be named until the eighth day upon his circumcision ceremony, and it was expected that a firstborn male would be named after his father. In an earlier passage, we learned that Zechariah had been visited by an angel proclaiming that he would be a father and the son would be named John. At the time, Zechariah doubted God’s gift to his family and was, as such, afflicted with dumbness. When it came time to name the child, the gathered priests and family assumed the baby would be named Zechariah, and were shocked when Elizabeth spoke out and said he was to be named John. This simply was not done in their culture, and when they turned to Zechariah for confirmation he wrote, “His name is John.” Immediately, God rewarded Zechariah for his faithfulness by restoring his speech, and he began shouting praises for God.

This laid the foundation for John the Baptist to become an outspoken preacher and right-hand man of Jesus. In the end, a name is just a name. It is a collection of letters strung together to identify a person. In this instance, John’s name was so much more, because it represented the faith of his parents in God’s will. It broke cultural norms and set John apart to be a chosen follower of Christ and leader of the early Christian Church.

Prayer: Lord, we are in awe of You and of the many miracles of this season. We ask that You would walk alongside us during our waiting, and that we would have the faith of Elizabeth and Zechariah. Prepare our hearts for the coming of Jesus, and give us voices to always shout Your praise.  Amen.

Contributed by Kathryn F. S. Geary

Read more Advent Reflections on the blog of the Shadyside Presbyterian Church website.

Download the full booklet of Advent Reflections.

Artwork: Detail of No Between © Jan L. Richardson. janrichardson.com. Inspired by Isaiah 64:1: “O that You would tear open the heavens and come down … .”

Advent Reflection: Dec. 21, 2017

Seasonal Devotions

Scripture: Luke 1:39–48a  (Today’s Readings)

Oh, my soul leaps with inexpressible joy.
Like a mother holding a newborn.
With great expectation, I wait for You.
You knew me before creation.
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.
I believe, but cannot see.
Your promises are true.
You have chosen me.
A humble servant.

Prayer: Father God, with joy we praise You, for You have come to be with us, and You have called us as Your own. Guide us now, that we may love and serve You with all of our lives.  Amen.

Contributed by Charie E. Daviston, Deacon

Read more Advent Reflections on the blog of the Shadyside Presbyterian Church website.

Download the full booklet of Advent Reflections.

Artwork: Detail of No Between © Jan L. Richardson. janrichardson.com. Inspired by Isaiah 64:1: “O that You would tear open the heavens and come down … .”